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Superfood Series: Kale Krazy!

The term ‘superfood’ has become a common concept in our everyday conversations. What makes a super food so super, and do we have to eat these magical foods to stay healthy? Can we eat a variety of ‘normal’ foods and get similar health benefits? Let s take a closer look to see what superfoods are all about.  All types of food provide our bodies with a variety of nutrients. We classify the nutrients in two groups namely macro and micro nutrients. Macronutrients are nutrients that contribute to the energy value or content of the food and appear in large quantities in foods. There are 3 macronutrients: carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Micronutrients do not contribute to the energy content of the food and appear in small quantities...

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National Nutrition Week – Re-Think Your Drink

This week is National Nutrition Week where the theme for the week is “Rethink your drink!” A particularly applicable theme after the latest Demographics and Health Survey indicated that two-thirds of women and a third of men in the country are overweight or obese. There are increasing worldwide consumption of ‘free’ sugars in the diet. These free sugars are found in foods or beverages that contain no vitamins or minerals or other nutrients, only sugar. Consumption of these, particularly in the form of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), is associated with weight gain in both children and adults. There are a number of beverages available to the public as an alternative to drinking water and as part of this week’s national nutrition week, we encourage South African’s...

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Superfood Series: Chia Seeds

The term ‘superfood’ has become a common concept in our everyday conversations. What makes a super food so super, and do we have to eat these magical foods to stay healthy? Can we eat a variety of ‘normal’ foods and get similar health benefits? Let s take a closer look to see what superfoods are all about.  All types of food provide our bodies with a variety of nutrients. We classify the nutrients in two groups namely macro and micro nutrients. Macronutrients are nutrients that contribute to the energy value or content of the food and appear in large quantities in foods. There are 3 macronutrients: carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Micronutrients do not contribute to the energy content of the food and appear in small quantities...

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Superfood Series: Is Quinoa All its cracked up to be?

The term ‘superfood’ has become a common concept in our everyday conversations. What makes a super food so super, and do we have to eat these magical foods to stay healthy? Can we eat a variety of ‘normal’ foods and get similar health benefits? Let s take a closer look to see what superfoods are all about.  All types of food provide our bodies with a variety of nutrients. We classify the nutrients in two groups namely macro and micro nutrients. Macronutrients are nutrients that contribute to the energy value or content of the food and appear in large quantities in foods. There are 3 macronutrients: carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Micronutrients do not contribute to the energy content of the food and appear in small quantities...

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Testimonial Series: 13kgs down and still going strong!

James shares his amazing change with dietitian, Jessica Pieterse, from Nutritional Solutions Bryanston. James was first seen by Jessica in October 2016 after his doctor advised him to lose weight as his health was compromised. He was on medication for his blood pressure and cholesterol, he was overweight and had a family history of stroke, heart attack and high cholesterol. James shares that “With Jessica’s guidance I reached my goal weight in 12 weeks and got to Jessica’s recommended goal weight for me in 14 weeks. I lost 13kgs during this period.”  “The health aspect of my diet is just as important as my weight control and I have so far, with my doctor’s blessing, been able to reduce my cholesterol and blood pressure medication by half. I...

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Vegetarian Eating: Part 2

Following on from the blog published last week, here are some more key nutrients that must be noted when following a vegetarian diet: Iron This is an essential mineral for all body cells, even though it is needed only in small quantities. Iron is a component of hemoglobin (the oxygen carrying protein in red blood cells) and plays a major role in transporting oxygen in the body. Iron from animal products known as haem-iron is more easily absorbed than the iron found in plants such as spinach. Plant foods that contain iron, often contain compounds that reduce the absorption of Iron. It is important to get your iron levels tested and discuss supplementation with your dietician or doctor.  Tips to increase iron absorption: Consume food high in Vitamin C (oranges, grapefruits, guavas, red, yellow and green peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, Brussel sprouts,...

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Vegetarian Eating: Part 1

Are you meeting your nutrient requirements? A vegetarian diet can be truly healthy as many plant foods are low in saturated fat and high in phyto-nutrients vitamins, minerals and fiber. However this way of eating does require careful planning to ensure your diet is well balanced including the necessary nutrients your body needs. There are categories of vegetarians that you may fall into: Lacto–ovo vegetarian: Lacto–ovo vegetarians don’t eat meat, fish or poultry, but do eat eggs and dairy products. Lacto vegetarian: Lacto vegetarians don’t eat meat, fish, poultry or eggs, but do eat dairy products. Ovo vegetarian: Ovo vegetarians don’t eat meat, fish, poultry or dairy, but do eat eggs Pesci–vegetarian: Pesci–vegetarians eat fish, dairy, and eggs but don’t eat meat or poultry. Vegan: Vegans avoid eating any animal products. They don’t eat any meat...

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 L’Shana Tova!

During times of celebration the social, symbolic and pleasure values of food become more important. It is therefore key that you try to make the best choices available despite the changing circumstances, routines and environment. During Rosh Hashanah, you will be offered a wide variety of delicious foods and snacks, spend a large amount of time around the table and be encouraged to eat more food than usual. These three factors can contribute to overeating.  Be aware that why and when you are eating is just as important as what you choose to eat.     Moderation is key Enjoy a small portion of the type of food you choose to eat. Be selective, as you do not have to eat everything on offer. Eat slowly to ensure maximum satisfaction...

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Managing Over-indulgences

Some of us often experience times of food cravings and over-indulging. These feelings or actual behaviors may be associated with a real physiological desire for something sweet or salty, or it can be driven by an emotion such as a feeling of sadness, anxiety, boredom, aggravation, frustration or tiredness. Skipping meals throughout the day and then seeking a “pick me up” during the mid -afternoon also leads to inappropriate snacking. Often the types of foods typically chosen are “convenient”, with a high fat and sugar content and these foods lack sufficient amounts of nutrients to sustain good health. A fruit however is convenient but yet hardly chosen to over-indulge on. Within a short space of time one may consume large amounts of food in an...

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Check out your Calcium

How much calcium is needed daily? Calcium is the most abundant and dominant mineral in the body. It is vital for bone health as it assists adequate bone deposition and thus prevents osteoporosis. It also helps with nerve transmission and muscle contraction. Current calcium recommendations for healthy individuals are 1000mg/day for both men and women between the ages of 19 – 50 years. This recommendation increases to 1200mg/ day for women over 50 years and men over 70 years. Most South African’s only manage to consume 500 – 600mg/ day meaning that we are falling short of our recommended daily intake for calcium. Is supplementation required? In light of conflicting evidence casting doubt on high dose calcium supplementation (>1000mg/ day) due to its suggested association with cardiovascular disease,...

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