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The Glycemic Index and Fruit

What is the Glycemic index? It is a numerical measure of the rate i.e. how fast and to what extent the intake of carbohydrate rich foods may affect your blood sugar levels. A food with a high GI raises blood sugar levels more than a food with a medium or low GI. Glucose has been given a numerical value of 100, because it is absorbed immediately into the bloodstream and all carbohydrate containing food such as fruit are compared to glucose, which is used as a reference. Factors affecting the absorption and digestion of fruit, which in turn may influence the GI of foods include: The amount of cooking (cooked apple versus raw apple); processing (fruit versus fruit juice); ripeness and storage time — the more ripe a fruit the...

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What’s the deal with dairy?

For years’ milk has been consumed with reckless abandon – the lower in fat, the better.  Until recently when low fat milk and its fat free counterpart has come under fire.  In the last few months as we’ve seen the shelves emptied of full cream milk we’ve heard accusations being thrown at the previously favoured fat free and low fat milk. These range from “full of added sugars” to “highly processed”.  Should you too be going full cream? Or is this another food fad that will pass? Many people are under the impression that when fat is removed from dairy, sugars are added, and as a result it is always best to just go for the full fat version.  This is a myth that can be dispelled...

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The Low-Down on Skinny Summer Sips

The silly season is officially here! And with it, comes year-end functions and holidays that bring extra socializing and the inevitable opportunity to over-indulge in alcohol. It’s no secret that the consumption of alcohol has a negative affect on health and can be highly detrimental to a kilojoule-controlled diet, particularly when trying to lose weight.  The American Heart Association recommends that the term"moderation" when referring to alcohol, equates to 1 to 2 alcoholic drinks for men and 1 drink per day for women. DID YOU KNOW?  1 gram of alcohol contains approximately 29.3 kJ of energy and as such, one standard drink provides an average of 600kJ per drink. To put this into context, in kilojoule terms, that is the equivalent in energy of 2  slices of bread per drink!  How many kilojoules are in...

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Chocolate Comparison

Treat (noun): an event or item that is out of the ordinary and gives great pleasure. The best treat food must be chocolate! Although it should be enjoyed in moderation, you can rest assured that it does contain small amounts of riboflavin, vitamin B12, manganese, phosphorus, zinc, calcium, magnesium and iron. People have been enjoying chocolate (or a variation thereof) from as early as 1900 BC. We are sure as the holiday season covers us all in glitter, tinsel and festive cheer, Chocolate treats will be enjoyed by all in the form of gifts, stocking fillers or after dinner sweets. We have put together this guideline to help you make an informed decision on your chocolate choice and to make you aware of the hefty kilojoule tag these treats carry. That's...

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Is it Right to Eat for your Blood Type?

According to naturopath Peter J. D'Adamo, blood type is a genetic fingerprint that is more powerful than race, culture or geography. The mechanism of action involves lectins which are a diverse group of proteins present in certain foods. The author claims that negative reactions between food lectins and our blood type are responsible for many ailments. This is due to the fact that lectin and Blood type interactions cause agglutination or build-up of blood cells in the tissue. His solution is to avoid the foods that contain the negative lectins, and as such, eat according to a specific blood type. Type O's (46 % of the population), belong to the oldest genetic group and need to eat meat virtually every day to satisfy ancient, hunter-gatherer genes....

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The Pro’s and Cons of Paleo

The Paleolithic (Paleo) diet, also known as the "Stone Age", “Caveman” or “hunter-gather” diet is based on the idea that we should eat like our ancestors did, thousands of years ago. In a nut shell (excuse the pun) when following this diet, all processed foods as well as dairy, legumes and grains are excluded from the diet. The positive aspects of the Paleo diet can be attributed to the fact that this dietary approach emphasizes the avoidance of processed foods. It also gives preference to lean meats, fish, vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds; all of which contribute to optimum health. The less positive concerns which may compromise overall health and wellness, when following this way of eating, are included in the following discussion points: The feasibility of this...

National Nutrition Week 9-16 October 2015 – Healthy Eating in the Work Place

What we eat at our place of work has a huge impact on our overall diet and influences our productivity. The prevalence of overweight and obesity combined is now 65% for females and 31% for males (2012 South African Health and Nutrition Examination Survey – SANHANES) and unhealthy workplace eating behaviour is believed to be playing a role in South Africa’s growing obesity problem. The theme of this year’s National Nutrition Week is “Healthy eating in the workplace". The aim is to target both private and public sector employees as well as food service providers for workplaces, in order to improve the awareness around healthy eating at work. It is well established that work site wellness programs show great results. A 2012 Meta-evaluation of Work site Health...

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What to do about the Dukan Diet?

Has the looming idea of Summer bikini beach-days got you searching for the nearest diet quick-fix? Perhaps you have stumbled upon the "Dukan Diet" in your web trawling and you are considering embarking on this diet? Read through the next installment on our "Which Diet is Best for Now" Blog series to find out the pro's and con's associated with the Dukan Diet as well as an overview of the diet itself. The diet designed by the French doctor Pierre Dukan consists of 3 phases. Although he strongly encourages all participants to complete all three phases, he has admitted that only approximately 50% of all patients do so. PHASE ONE also called the Attack phase This phase can vary between 5 -10 days and patients are allowed to ONLY eat protein...

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Healthy Eating during the Jewish Holiday Celebrations

We at Nutritional Solutions wish all of our Jewish Clients and readers a blessed New Year. We know that during times of celebration the social and pleasure components of food are a big focus. It is therefore important that you try to make the best choices despite changing circumstances, routines and environment. During Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and other Jewish holidays you will be offered a wide variety of delicious foods and snacks. Try to eat mindfully as far as possible during these periods and not be swayed by the visibility and availability of the food. Eating according to your actual appetite is always a good start. Moderation is key! Only have a small portion of the type of food you chose to eat. Be selective as you do not have...

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The Info on Intermittent Fasting Diets

Intermittent fasting is an eating pattern where one cycles between periods of eating and periods of fasting. This entails restricting energy intake to less than 75% of usual intake for 1-3 days per week and eating freely on non-restriction days. It is proposed that this type of eating pattern may have powerful benefits for your body and brain. In this blog post we discuss these claims within the context of the current evidence to determine whether this way of eating really does confer the benefits it proposes to. Here are 5 claims made by those who promote intermittent fasting:  Changes the function of cells, genes and hormones IF is reported to: Decrease insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity (to help increase fat burning) Increase human growth hormone (to increase muscle...

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